Films and Showtimes

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Past Films

The Philadelphia Story (1940)

  • Starring: Katharine Hepburn, Cary Grant, James Stewart, John Howard
  • Director: George Cukor
  • Genre(s): Classics , Comedy , Romance
  • Rating: NR
  • Running Time: 112 min.

This new quarterly series showcases the “essential” films everyone should see on the big screen. For each month-long program, we’ll screen five films organized by one of the following themes: directors, actors, genres, and eras/movements.

Essential tickets are $9 for Adults, $8 for Students/Seniors and Members get in Free!

A true iconoclast known for her intelligence, determination and fierce demeanor Katharine Hepburn demonstrated remarkable staying power in a screen career that spanned more than six decades, winning three of her four Best Actress Oscars after the age of 60.

Film Summary: Set among the upper class in 1930s Philadelphia, this irreverent classic romantic comedy features radiant performances by three legendary stars. On the eve of her marriage to an uninteresting man, a headstrong socialite jousts verbally with her charming ex-husband, drinks too much champagne, and flirts outrageously with a handsome reporter.

"The film is a Hepburn triumph, and moviegoers who resent the theatre's habit of requisitioning their stars may feel that Miss Hepburn's time on the stage has not been spent in vain and that she simply prepared herself for this achievement."
- John C. Mosher, New Yorker
"Every time Katharine Hepburn, Cary Grant, and Jimmy Stewart connect in a scene, we hear the happy ding! of quality champagne crystal."
- Mark Bourne, Film.com
"Cukor and Donald Ogden Stewart's evergreen version of Philip Barry's romantic farce, centreing on a socialite wedding threatened by scandal, is a delight from start to finish, with everyone involved working on peak form."
- Geoff Andrew, Time Out
"It has been a long time since Hollywood has spent itself so extravagantly, and to such entertaining effect, upon a straight upper-crust fable, an unblushing apologia for plutocracy."
- Bosley Crowther, New York Times

Showtimes