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Grey Gardens (1975)

Meet a mother and daughter, high-society dropouts, reclusive cousins of Jackie O., managing to thrive together amid the decay and disorder of their East Hampton, NY, mansion, making for an eerily ramshackle echo of the American Camelot.
(PG, 94 min.)

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Wednesday, May 18, 2022

(TBD)

Meet Big and Little Edie Beale: mother and daughter, high-society dropouts, and reclusive cousins of Jackie Onassis. The two manage to thrive together amid the decay and disorder of their East Hampton, New York, mansion, making for an eerily ramshackle echo of the American Camelot. An impossibly intimate portrait, this 1976 documentary by Albert and David Maysles, codirected by Ellen Hovde and Muffie Meyer, quickly became a cult classic and established Little Edie as a fashion icon and philosopher queen. [Janus]

Starring: Edith 'Little Edie' Bouvier Beale, Edith Bouvier Beale
Director: Albert Maysles, David Maysles, Ellen Hovde, Muffie Meyer
Genre(s): Drama, Comedy, Documentary

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"One of the most entertaining films ever made by the legendary Maysles brothers and their gifted associates."

— David Sterritt, Christian Science Monitor

"The beauty of this film is the dignity it imparts to the Beales, trapped in their pasts. They failed to launch, yet paradoxically, they continue to fly so high."

— Joshua Rothkopf, Time Out

"Grey Gardens became a cult film in the '70s, when mavericks and outsiders were the heroes and heroines and the Beales were valued for their alternative world and their priceless eccentricity."

— Chicago Tribune

"The house was beautiful once, and so were the Beales... Grey Gardens, one of the most haunting documentaries in a long time, preserves their strange existence, and we're pleased that it does."

— Roger Ebert, Chicago Sun-Times

"Part of the reason Grey Gardens—named for the dilapidated East Hamptons mansion Little Edie shares with her mother, Edith “Big Edie” Bouvier Beale—is so deep and endlessly rewatchable is that the Beales’ pleasure in being seen is matched by the Maysles’ joy in watching. These exhibitionists found the perfect voyeurs, and vice versa."

— Nathan Rabin, The Dissolve