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The Essentials: All About Eve (1950)

An ingenue insinuates herself into the lives of an established but aging stage
actress and her circle of theater friends.
(PG, 138 min.)

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The Essentials: Bette Davis
This quarterly series showcases the “essential” films everyone should see on the big screen. For each month-long program, we’ll screen five films organized by one of the following themes: directors, actors, genres, and eras/movements.

Essential tickets are $9 for Adults, $8 for Students/Seniors and Members get in Free

Summary: An ingenue insinuates herself into the lives of an established but aging stage actress and her circle of theater friends.

Starring: Bette Davis, Anne Baxter, George Sanders
Director: Joseph L. Mankiewicz
Genre: Drama

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"It crackles with smart, smarting dialogue."

— TIME Staff, TIME Magazine

"About Eve ranks among the smartest comedy-dramas in many, many years."

— Bob Thomas, Associated Press

"[Bette Davis'] veteran actress Margo Channing in "All About Eve" (1950) was her greatest role."

— Roger Ebert, Chicago Sun-Times

"[Features] more quotable dialogue in one movie than most screenwriters manage in a lifetime."

— Trevor Johnston, Time Out

"A motion picture that, because of its priceless dialogue and unforgettable lead performance, will never lose its luster."

— James Berardinelli, ReelViews

"All About Eve is not only a brilliant and clever portrait of an actress, it is a downright funny film, from its opening scene to the final fadeout."

— Kate Cameron, New York Daily News

"Joseph Mankiewicz was Hollywood's midcentury master of comic drama, and All About Eve, from 1950, was one of his signal achievements."

— Richard Brody, New Yorker

"A fine Darryl Zanuck production, excellent music and an air of ultra-class complete this superior satire. The legitimate theatre had better look to its laurels."

— Bosley Crowther, New York Times

"Joseph L Mankiewicz's film dissects the narcissism and hypocrisy of the spotlight as sharply as [Billy Wilder's Sunset Blvd], but pays equal attention to the challenges of enacting womanhood."

— Ben Walters, Time Out