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Two Tuesdays: Kill Bill: Vol. 1 (2003)

After awakening from a four-year coma, a former assassin wreaks vengeance on the team of assassins who betrayed her.

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Tuesday, May 21, 2024

(TBD)

Discover cinematic connections with Two Tuesdays—a curated film series pairing related movies on the last two Tuesdays of the month. This series is Free for Members.
May 21: Kill Bill Vol. 1 (2003)
May 28: Kill Bill: Vol. 2 (2004)

A former assassin, known simply as The Bride (Uma Thurman), wakes from a coma four years after her jealous ex-lover Bill (David Carradine) attempts to murder her on her wedding day. Fueled by an insatiable desire for revenge, she vows to get even with every person who contributed to the loss of her unborn child, her entire wedding party, and four years of her life. After devising a hit list, The Bride sets off on her quest, enduring unspeakable injury and unscrupulous enemies. [RT]

Starring: Uma Thurman, Lucy Liu, Vivica A. Fox, David Carradine, Daryl Hannah
Director: Quentin Tarantino
Genre(s): Crime, Action, Thriller

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"Guaranteed to blow you away."

— Stella Papamichael, BBC.com

"Delivered with such high panache and brio, it's mesmerizing."

— Stephen Hunter, Washington Post

"Has matched, if not eclipsed, the power and scope of 1994's Pulp Fiction."

— Desson Thomson, Washington Post

"Kill Bill confirms [Quentin Tarantino] as a filmmaker of astonishing invention and aplomb."

— Geoffrey O'Brien, Film Comment Magazine

"Kill Bill not only lives up to the hype, it exceeds it, with some of the most amazing fight sequences ever filmed."

— Bill Muller, Arizona Republic

"There's nothing like a good 'ole revenge heist (complete with a hit list) to make this film one of Tarantino's best."

— Candice Frederick, Reel Talk Online

"Kill Bill: Volume 1 shows Quentin Tarantino so effortlessly and brilliantly in command of his technique that he reminds me of a virtuoso violinist racing through Flight of the Bumble Bee ..."

— Roger Ebert, Chicago Sun-Times

"There is no ironic overlay in Tarantino's movies, no 'commenting' on the pop schlock he's replicating. He simply wants to remake in his own way the kinds of movies he's always loved, and he's about as uncynical as a movie geek can be."

— Peter Rainer, New York Magazine/Vulture